Teacher Toolkit

English Language Arts 3rd Grade

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Grade 3

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
30 English/Language Arts Standards Met

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  • Standards are addressed through a self-guided tour of the World of Coca-Cola.
  • Standards may be fulfilled in more than one area of the attraction.
  • Please feel free to ask ambassadors to tell your class about their specific areas as you tour.
  • Teachers may choose to ask students to bring paper and pencil in an empty book bag for some activities listed below.
  • Look for the Coca-Cola red bottle to direct you to the appropriate student activities.

ELA3C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

  1. Identifies and uses nouns (singular, plural, possessive) correctly.
  2. Speaks and writes in complete and coherent sentences.
  3. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (end marks, commas, apostrophes, quotation marks).

ELA3LSV1 The student uses oral and visual strategies to communicate. The student:

  1. Adapts oral language to fit the situation by following the rules of conversation with peers and adults.
  2. Recalls, interprets, and summarizes information presented orally.
  3. Listens to and views a variety of media to acquire information.

ELA3R1 The student demonstrates the ability to read orally with speed, accuracy, and expression. The student:

  1. Reads familiar text with expression.

ELA3R2 The student acquires and uses grade-level words to communicate effectively. The student:

  1. Reads literary and informational texts and incorporates new words into oral and written language.

ELA3R3 The student uses a variety of strategies to gain meaning from grade-level text. The student:

  1. Reads a variety of texts for information and pleasure.
  2. Generates questions to improve comprehension.
  3. Summarizes text content.
  4. Interprets information from illustrations, diagrams, charts, graphs, and graphic organizers.
  5. Makes connections between texts and/or personal experiences.
  6. Identifies and infers cause-and-effect relationships and draws conclusions.
  7. Recalls explicit facts and infers implicit facts.

ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student:

  1. Captures a reader‘s interest by setting a purpose and developing a point of view.
  2. Writes text of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.
  3. Begins to use specific sensory details (e.g. strong verbs, adjectives) to enhance descriptive effect.
  4. Pre-writes to generate ideas, develops a rough draft, rereads to revise, and edits to correct.

ELA3W2 The student begins to write in a variety of genres, including narrative, informational, persuasive, and response to literature. Critical Component: The student produces a narrative that:

  1. Sustains a focus.
  2. Includes the appropriate purpose, expectations, and length for the audience and genre.
  3. Uses sensory details and other literary language to communicate setting, character, and plot.
  4. May include prewriting.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

english-language-3-gallery1-3

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola..

  • Before entering the gallery, explain to your students that this gallery tells them how John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola. Ask your students to take out a pencil and a piece of paper, or their notebook. Tell students that their job is to enter the gallery and use the signs and artifacts located in the gallery to find four facts about how John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola.
  • Share the facts discovered in this gallery with the class. Allow your students to view the videos located on the wall. After viewing the videos, ask students to summarize the information they have just discovered.
  • Ask students if they have ever invented anything. Remind them that using their imagination to change a recipe to make it better is also a type of invention. Discuss with students their reasons for making the invention.
  • Before leaving the gallery, ask students to write two or three sentences to summarize how John Pemberton invented
    Coca-Cola. Remind them to use capital letters and punctuation.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

english-language-2-gallery3-2

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

  • Tell students that Asa Candler bought The Coca-Cola Company from John Pemberton when it was still a very small business. It was the marketing ability of Asa Candler that expanded the business from basically a local enterprise to a nationally distributed product.
  • Read to students the plaque located in the glass case (see picture above) called “A Brand Becomes a Business”. Ask groups of students to gather around the plaque with you as other students investigate the gallery. Ask these students to re-read the plaque with you using choral reading. Explain to students that since they have already heard the reading, now they may read it together, concentrating on using expression.
  • Ask students to share words they did not know, or that were challenging to them. Ask students what strategies they use to figure out words they don‘t know. (Using context, sounding out letters or parts of words, etc.)
  • Before leaving this gallery, ask your students to think of a cause/effect relationship that they have learned about so far in the World of Coca-Cola. (John Pemberton experimented with different ingredients resulting in the invention of Coca-Cola, Pemberton sold the company to Candler causing the business to expand nationwide, etc.)

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 8
(International Room)

social-studies-1-gallery8

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery features a World War II case that details how The Coca-Cola Company provided the Coca-Cola product to soldiers during World War II.

  • Ask students to read the plaque entitled, “Refreshing the Troops”. Ask students to read the plaque silently, then read it orally to a friend. Ask students to list words that gave them trouble. Ask students what strategy they used to figure out the word.
  • Ask students to write one question from this plaque that another student can answer. Ask students to pair up to answer these questions.
  • Ask students to look throughout the gallery and find one singular and one plural noun. Share the nouns that have been found.

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 9

english-language-3-gallery9-3

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases Coca-Cola‘s involvement with the Olympic Games throughout the years.

  • Ask students to read the plaque, “Coca-Cola and the Olympic Torch Relay”, alone or with a friend. Once all students have finished reading the plaque, ask them the following questions:
    • When did Coca-Cola first start supplying products to the Olympic Games?
      • (1928)
    • Where were the 1928 games held?
      • (Amsterdam)
    • Which company has been the longest continuous supporter of the Olympics?
      • (Coca-Cola)
    • What opportunity has The Coca-Cola Company offered to people over the years?
      • (The opportunity to be a torchbearer)

 

Location- Bottleworks

english-language-3-bottleworks2

Connections

Bottleworks is a fully functioning bottling plant. It showcases how technology has been important to the bottling industry.

  • Bring your students‘ attention to the illustration on the charts located in the office window. Ask students to determine what this information is about. (Tests that are done on bottles of Coca-Cola). Ask students if the information would be as easy to understand if there were no illustrations. Ask students to choose one test and explain to a friend why it is done.
  • Ask students to explore this area and find three facts they did not already know. Ask student to write these facts down then discuss.

 

Location- Pop Culture, 2nd Floor

english-language-1-popculture3

Connections

This area contains many letters written by both students and adults about their own Coca-Cola story. Computers are available for students to write their own letters.

  • After viewing the elements in the room, ask students to notice the “My Coke Story” board near the front door. Read a few of the letters to your students. Tell students to take out a piece of paper and a pencil. Ask students to do a prewriting of their own Coke story. Remind students to use strong verbs and adjectives to give sensory details within their story. Remind them that they need a good “hook” or beginning to grab their reader“s interest. Find a letter or two that has a good hook on the wall for an example. Give students a few minutes to do this.
  • Tell students that when they get back to the classroom, they will reread their writing in order to revise for content and to edit for spelling errors. A final copy can be published on the stationery provided at the “My Coke Story” area and sent back to the World of Coca-Cola.

 


 

Grade 3

Lesson Plan
30 English/Language Arts Standards Met

What a History!

Pre-visit Activity

ELA3LSV1 The student uses oral and visual strategies to communicate. The student:

  1. Adapts oral language to fit the situation by following the rules of conversation with peers and adults.
  2. Recalls, interprets, and summarizes information presented orally.

ELA3R1 The student demonstrates the ability to read orally with speed, accuracy, and expression. The student:

  1. Reads familiar text with expression.

ELA3R2 The student acquires and uses grade-level words to communicate effectively. The student:

  1. Reads literary and informational texts and incorporates new words into oral and written language.

ELA3R3 The student uses a variety of strategies to gain meaning from grade-level text. The student:

  1. Reads a variety of texts for information and pleasure.
  2. Summarizes text content.

ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student:

a. Captures a reader‘s interest by setting a purpose and developing a point of view.
c. Writes text of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.

Objectives:

  1. Students will complete a KWL chart.
  2. Students will do research on the Olympic games.
  3. Students will conduct work in small groups.
  4. Students will produce a poem, song, poster board, play or report about what they have learned.
  5. Students will use a rubric to guide their work, as well as to evaluate their completed project.

Materials

  • One copy of the KWL chart per student
  • One copy of the attached rubric per student
  • Access to a computer, groups of 3 students will use the Web site:
    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/olympics/
  • Access to colored paper, poster board, pencils, colored pencils, magic markers, etc.

Time — 3 days: 1 hour each day

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Discuss the upcoming field trip to the World of Coca-Cola with your class. Explain that one of the galleries displays various Olympic torches, as well as Olympic pins from past Olympic events. Tell students that over the next few days they will be doing research about the history of the Olympics. This will help them understand the importance of the items they will see on the field trip.
  2. Pass out the attached KWL chart to students. Ask students to go to the “K” column and write things they already know about the Olympics. Next, ask student to go to the “W” column and write things they would like to know about the Olympics. Share some of these “Want to know” items with the class. Collect the KWL charts until after the research is complete.
  3. Group students into groups of three. You may want to consider grouping weaker readers with more able students.
  4. Show students the Internet site at Enchanted Learning located at:
    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/olympics/. Discuss with students how this page is organized. First, there is a short history of the Olympics, followed by various important elements associated with the Olympics like the flag, flame and torch. Finally, at the end of the page are located various printouts of Olympic elements that may be useful for the projects groups will be completing.
  5. Tell students they will be using this page for research on the Olympics. Ask each member of the group to take turns reading a paragraph from the Internet page to the rest of the group orally. This page will no doubt need to be read more than once. Ask students to use expression as they read.
  6. Groups will take notes on important facts and then produce a play, poem, song, poster, or written report about what they have learned. Give students the due date for the completed project.
  7. Students will grade their own group‘s work based on the attached rubric. Share the rubric with students before they begin so they can see what quality of work is expected. Point out that each student will be evaluating how well his or her group worked together.
  8. Share projects with the class.
  9. Once the projects have been shared, pass out the KWL chart once again. Ask students to add what they have learned through this project to the ”L“ section of their chart. Collect.

Closing

Tell students that they will be seeing a number of Olympic torches at the World of Coca-Cola attraction. It may be possible for them to hold one of the torches as well. This depends on the number of students at the attraction at the time.

Assessment

Teachers can use the KWL chart as well as the rubric filled out by students for an assessment. Teachers may also choose to do an informal assessment on each group‘s ability to work well together.

Gifted Students:

For gifted students, you may wish to open up the research to other sites that provide not only more information, but provide more challenging reading. Sites your students may enjoy using include:
http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/games/olympics.htm
http://www.chevroncars.com/learn/sports/history-olympic-games

 

KWL Chart

K
(What I already know)
W
(What I want to learn)
L
(What I learned)

 

Grading Rubric for Olympic Research

Circle the sections in each row that describe your group‘s work.
Add the points together to get your grade.

My Name__________________________________
Members of my group were:_____________________________________________

 

Excellent Job
4 points
Good Job
3 points
Fair Job
2 points
Poor Job
1 point
The group worked together to find at least 7 facts about the Olympics. The group worked together to find at least 5 facts about the Olympics. The group did not work very well together. At least 3 facts were found. The group did not work well together. Only one or two facts were found
The group project was carefully done. All facts were included in an easy to understand way. The group project was neatly done. All facts were included. The group project was done. All facts were included. The group project was messy. Facts may or may not have been included.
All spelling is correct. Most spelling is correct. (one or two errors) There are 3 or 4 spelling errors. There are many spelling errors.
The project was completed before it was due. The project was completed when it was due. The project was completed, but was late. The project was never completed.

14-16 points…A      11-13 points…B      8-10 points…C      7 points or below…D

Write a few sentences about how well you think your group worked together:

My grade for this project is __________

 


My Coke Story

Post-Visit Activity

ELA3C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

  1. Speaks and writes in complete coherent sentences.
  2. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (end marks, commas, apostrophes, quotation marks).

ELA3W1 The student demonstrates competency in the writing process. The student:

  1. Captures a reader‘s interest by setting a purpose and developing a point of view.
  2. Writes text of a length appropriate to address the topic to tell the story.
  3. Begins to use specific sensory details (e.g. strong verbs, adjectives) to enhance descriptive effect.
  4. Pre-writes to generate ideas, develops a rough draft, rereads to revise, and edits to correct.

ELA3W2 The student begins to write in a variety of genres, including narrative, informational, persuasive, and response to literature. Critical Component: The student produces a narrative that:

  1. Sustains a focus.
  2. Includes the appropriate purpose, expectations, and length for the audience and genre.
  3. Uses sensory details and other literary language to communicate setting, character, and plot.
  4. May include pre-writing.

Objectives

  1. Students will use the pre-writing done at the World of Coca-Cola to revise, edit and write a final version.
  2. Students will work with a partner to improve their use of strong verbs and adjectives, spelling, and use of capital letters.
  3. Students will read their writing to the class.

Materials

  • Pencils
  • Paper
  • The pre-writing done at the World of Coca-Cola attraction
  • Stationery from the World of Coca-Cola attraction

Time — 30 minutes writing time

1 hour for students to take turns reading their work to the class

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Ask students to get out their pre-writing done at the World of Coca-Cola.
  2. Ask students to use a yellow crayon and highlight verbs or adjectives in their work.
  3. Ask students to get into groups of two. Partners will help each other find stronger verbs and adjectives to use within their story. Students will write the alternative word in the margin of their work.
  4. Next, ask students to work with their partner to correct all misspelling and capitalization errors.
  5. Students will then take their corrected work and copy it onto the stationery you picked up at the attraction.
  6. Ask students to share their work by reading it to the class.
  7. Send the completed letters to the World of Coca-Cola. Make a copy first for assessment.

Closing

Ask students what they liked the most about their field trip to the World of Coca-Cola. Make a list of your student’s favorite parts of the attraction on the board.

Assessment

Use the copy of the letter written by your students for assessment.