Teacher Toolkit

Social Studies 2nd Grade

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Grade 2

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
2 Social Studies Standards Met

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  • Standards are addressed through a self-guided tour of the World of Coca-Cola.
  • Standards may be fulfilled in more than one area of the attraction.
  • Please feel free to ask ambassadors to tell your class about their specific areas as you tour.
  • Teachers may choose to ask students to bring paper and pencil in an empty book bag for some activities listed below.
  • Look for the Coca-Cola red bottle to direct you to the appropriate student activities.

SS2E2 The student will identify ways in which goods and services are allocated (by price; majority rule; contests; force; sharing; lottery; command; first-come, first-served; personal characteristics; and others).

SS2E3 The student will explain that people usually use money to obtain the goods and services they want and explain how money makes trade easier than barter.

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola.

  • Ask students what would make them try a new product. (Free sample, coupon for a free sample, advertisements make product sound interesting, attractive packaging)
  • Look at the case located on the top of the soda fountain. Show students the variety of coupons for free samples of Coca-Cola located there. Tell your students that Mr. Pemberton sold his formula to Mr. Candler a few years after Pemberton developed it. Asa Candler was a marketing whiz! He was one of the first people to offer coupons for a free sample of a product. Ask your students why these free coupons would be important as a new product is introduced. (It encourages people to try the product.)
  • The price was set at 5 cents when Coca-Cola was first introduced. This was actually expensive for the time. However, for over 70 years, as prices for other products rose, Mr. Candler and other owners of the company decided to keep the price of
    Coca-Cola at 5 cents. Ask your students why the owner of a company would keep the price of the product low even if it was possible to price it higher. (More people will buy it, it will be very popular)
  • Ask your students why using money to buy a product is easier than bartering. Ask students to think of things that could be bartered for a Coca-Cola today. Ask them to identify ways that demonstrate the impracticality of bartering for Coca-Cola and other products.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

  • When Mr. Candler bought the company from Mr. Pemberton, Candler was one of the first people to use free coupons, advertising in newspapers and even advertising on the back of students’ report cards. (Ask student how advertisements affect their behavior. Ask students to point out a variety of ways used to advertise (or market) Coca-Cola located in the room).
  • Ask students to look at the flip board in Gallery 3. This board tells students the cost of products as compared to the cost of
    Coca-Cola when it first became available. To make this board more meaningful to second graders, as they flip up the board to discover the price of items at the time of the first Coca-Cola in 1886, give them the price below for the same product today. Prices given are approximate only.
    Car…$20,000
    Gas…$1.75
    Watch…$35.00
    Toothpaste…$4.50
    Haircut…$25.00
    Hotel room…$70.00
    Perfume…$100.00
    Shoes…$60.00
    Newspaper…75 cents
    Bread…$3.00
    Coffee…$1.00
    Eggs…$3.00

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States as shown on the bottle wall and the world as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina.

  • Ask students to study the wall that shows the variety of bottles that were used to sell Coca-Cola. Ask students why it would be important to have a uniform bottle that
    Coca-Cola would come in, rather than many different kinds of bottles. (There would be no question about the product that is being purchased). Ask students how the size of the bottle relates to price and how price is determined today based on bottle size.

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 7
(Within Arms Reach of Desire)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how innovations have been used to change how customers purchase the Coca-Cola product.

  • This room shows how Robert Woodruff brought Coca-Cola within easy reach of most people. He did this through moving from offering the drink primarily at soda fountains to selling the drink in six packs and fountain dispensers. Mr. Woodruff set the price of a six pack of Coca-Cola at 25 cents instead of the 30 cents that it would cost to buy six bottles individually. Ask students why he would give one bottle away free in each 6 pack. (It was a new way of buying Coca-Cola, this would encourage people to buy more of the product.) Ask students how they think making sure that Coca-Cola was available everywhere would increase profits for the company. (If it is found in more places, more people will buy it.) Bring students’ attention to the soft drink dispenser used in space.

 


 

Grade 2

Lesson Plan
2 Social Studies Standards Met

The Field Trip

Pre-visit Activity

SS2E2 The student will identify ways in which goods and services are allocated (by price; majority rule; contests; force; sharing; lottery; command; first-come, first-served; personal characteristics; and others).

SS2E3 The student will explain that people usually use money to obtain the goods and services they want and explain how money makes trade easier than barter.

Objectives:

  • Students will use the experiences of second grade students in the book How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty by Nathan Zimelman to explain how money was obtained and used.
  • Students will explain how barter would have made the field trip impossible.
  • Students will work in groups to decide how they would earn money to go to the World of Coca-Cola if they had to pay for it themselves.

Materials

  • How the Second Grade Got $8,205.50 to Visit the Statue of Liberty, by Nathan Zimelman and Bill Slavin, 1992
  • White board/Black board to keep track of profit
  • Large construction paper
  • Magic Markers

Time – 1 Hour

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Procedures

  1. Review with your students the vocabulary:
    1. Profit: The money that is left over when a product or service is sold after all expenses are paid
    2. Expenses: The costs involved in selling a good or service
    3. Price: The cost of a good or service
    4. Barter: The exchange of goods and services without the use of money
  2. Read the book to your students.
  3. Keep track together on the white board of the expenses and profit gained by the class as you read the book.
  4. Ask students how they think the second graders decided on the price of the goods and services they offered. What was their most important service?
  5. Ask students how the class figured out what their profit was. (They subtracted their expenses from their income, and that left the profit.)
  6. Ask students to explain how the use of barter would or would not have helped the class get to the Statue of Liberty. (It would not have helped. They needed money to pay for the trip.)
  7. Ask students to get into groups of three or four. Give each group one piece of large construction paper and a magic marker. They should write “The World of Coca-Cola” at the top of the page. Ask students to assume that the cost to go to the attraction is $100. With that cost in mind, ask your students to list things they could do to earn the money as a class to go on the field trip. Share each group’s ideas with the class.
  8. Ask students to explain if they think bartering would be a good way to earn the money for the field trip.

Closing

Share with students how much the trip to the World of Coca-Cola will actually cost. Be sure to include the cost of the bus. Finally, ask students how this will be paid. (donations from parents) Ask your students to thank their parents for providing the money needed to pay for their field trip when they get home.

Assessment

Informally review your student’s ability to determine the problems with bartering, ways to earn money that are reasonable, and their ability to work cooperatively in a group.


Snack Shop Day!

Post Visit Activity

SS2E2 The student will identify ways in which goods and services are allocated (by price; majority rule; contests; force; sharing; lottery; command; first-come, first-served; personal characteristics; and others).

SS2E3 The student will explain that people usually use money to obtain the goods and services they want and explain how money makes trade easier than barter.

Materials

  • Send home attached information sheets, one per child
  • Poster board
  • Paper
  • Parents to run the stores
  • Tape

Time – 2 days: 1 hour each day

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Procedure
Setting up a Snack Shop

About two days before your “Snack Shop Day,” print off coins or use coins from your classroom math kit. Students will earn money through good behavior such as bringing back homework (10 cents), good behavior in the hall (25 cents) and so on. Students can keep their coins in a zip lock bag in their desks.

  1. Send a note home with students about a week before Snack Shop Day asking parents to help their student make about 10 simple snack items to bring to school on a pre-set day. The note attached also asks parents to come and help for the hour the shop is in session. Cookies, chocolate covered pretzels, etc. would be good for this activity. It should be simple.
  2. Decide how the students will determine the price of their items the day before your students bring in their items. Will they hold a contest for their items (e.g. guess how many marbles in a jar..sell tickets for each guess), sell them as a pre-determined price first come, first served, hold a lottery (e.g. student makes tickets with numbers on them, sells tickets, purchaser puts name on the ticket purchased and it goes in a jar, winning number is pulled from the jar), etc. Students may decide to use barter as well.
  3. Give students poster board to make a sign for their product. Included on the poster should be the way the student has decided to allocate their good. Make sure to remind students that if they are using a contest or a lottery they will need to make tickets.
  4. Give students a few minutes to put their desks in a circle and afix their advertisement with tape to the front of their desks with tape on Snack Shop Day. Parents who come in can take charge of more than one snack shop desk to allow students to use their earnings to purchase goods or tickets from other store owners. Four or five parents would be useful.
  5. Ask all students to donate one snack to you, in case some children don’t win a contest or get the chance to be the “first come” for sale items.
  6. Allow students to eat their snacks, once time is up. Distribute the donated snacks to students who did not get the opportunity to purchase them.
  7. Discuss with your students the problems that can come with “first come, first served”. (Sometimes the goods run out and some people don’t get any.) Ask students what the problem is with contests and lotteries. (Only one person gets the snack.) If any of your students used barter, discuss how that went.

Closing

Ask students to explain the pros/cons of each way they chose to allocate price.

Assessment

Ask students to write one paragraph about what they learned about how goods are sold during the day’s activity. They should also include what they thought worked well and what did not. Students can also write a thank you letter to the parents who participated in the day.