Teacher Toolkit

Social Studies 4th Grade

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Grade 4

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
6 Social Studies Standards Met

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SS4CG5 The student will name positive character traits of key historic figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Location-The Loft

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You will find fascinating artifacts from the past and present showcasing the rich heritage of Coca-Cola.

Connections

 

SS4E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as colonial decisions about what crops to grow and products to produce).
  2. Explain how voluntary exchange helps both buyers and sellers (such as prehistoric and colonial trade in North America).
  3. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade activities in the early nation were managed differently under the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution).
  4. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola. The process Pemberton followed as an entrepreneur is featured.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 2
(Developing a Logo)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how a logo is developed.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States (as shown on the bottle wall) and the world (as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina).

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 7
(Within an Arm’s Reach of Desire)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how innovations have been used to change how customers purchase the Coca-Cola product.

 

Location- Bottleworks

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Connections

Bottleworks is a fully functioning bottling plant. It showcases how technology has been important to the bottling industry.

 


 

Grade 4

Lesson Plan
6 Social Studies Standards Met

I Need a Business

Pre-visit Activity

SS4E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as colonial decisions about what crops to grow and products to produce).
  2. Explain how voluntary exchange helps both buyers and sellers (such as prehistoric and colonial trade in North America).
  3. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade activities in the early nation were managed differently under the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution).
  4. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

Objectives:

  1. Students will make a list of questions to ask a local entrepreneur.
  2. Students will conduct an interview of a local entrepreneur.
  3. Students will ask relevant questions of the visitor and show proper etiquette.
  4. Students will use the information gained from this activity as they evaluate business decisions made by early owners of The Coca-Cola Company during their field trip.

Materials

Time — 2 days (1 Hour each day – one day to prepare, one day for visitor)

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Procedure

Before your visitor is scheduled to arrive :
  1. Discuss jobs your students do to earn money. List them on the board. Why do they do this work? How do they determine what price to charge? Are there expenses? Where do their customers come from? Explain to students that when they do things like mowing lawns, watching people’s pets and babysitting they are being entrepreneurs. An entrepreneur is a person who starts his or her own business.
  2. Read the book, The Little Entrepreneur Takes Flight. Discuss how this book relates to your students’ job experiences.
  3. Ask your students to brainstorm questions they would like to ask the entrepreneur who is coming to visit your class. Guide students to think about how the economic activity your guest is involved in affects both him/her and customers. Questions might include: How did he/she determine with the price charged? How does his business affect him/her and the customers? What made them open their own business? How does their business help the economic activity of the area? How does technology affect his/her business?
  4. List questions on the board. Go through the questions and determine which ones students think would be appropriate to ask their guest.
  5. Review the etiquette of having a guest in the room, talking one at a time, not interrupting the speaker etc.
  6. After your speaker has visited, ask students to write a thank you letter to the visitor.

Closing

Remind students that on their field trip, they will be learning about how John Pemberton and Asa Candler were entrepreneurs of The Coca-Cola Company who had many of the same economic issues as your guest. Ask students to be sure and take paper and pencils with them on the field trip. (They will also see how technology has impacted The Coca-Cola business&rquo;). The student’s job is to take notes that link the experiences of these men to that of their classroom visitor, as well as to their own job experiences. After the field trip, compare notes taken by your class.

Assessment

Assess your student‘s ability to ask relevant questions of your visitor, as well as find links between Mr. Candler’s experiences and that of their visitor.

 


Every Product Has a History!

Post-Visit Activity

SS4E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as colonial decisions about what crops to grow and products to produce).
  2. Explain how voluntary exchange helps both buyers and sellers (such as prehistoric and colonial trade in North America).
  3. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade activities in the early nation were managed differently under the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution).
  4. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

Objectives

  1. Students will evaluate how entrepreneurs impact trade and economic activity.
  2. Students will do research on how economic concepts and technology have impacted a chosen business.
  3. Students will prepare a presentation of their choice to show what has been learned.

Materials

Time — 1 hour each day over three days

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Procedure

  1. Review with students what they learned about the economic concepts of trade, exchange, and price incentives from their visitor and the field trip.
  2. Group students into teams of two or three.
  3. Ask student groups to choose one product to research from its invention to the current day. This will be easier if using a computer. Typing in the product followed by the word “history” will bring up information. For example, if a group is interested in chocolate, typing in “Hershey chocolate history” into a search engine brings up needed information. Students should take notes concerning how the product is traded, how it was and is produced, how technology has influenced the product, and how price has influenced the sale of the product.
  4. Once the information has been collected, students should decide how they will present their information to the class. It might be in the form of a report, a TV show, a play, a song, etc.

Closing

Students will present their reports.

Assessment

Assess students on the quality of their report and their ability to work cooperatively.