Teacher Toolkit

English Langauge Arts 4th Grade

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Grade 4

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
26 English/Language Arts Standards Met

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ELA4C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

  1. Uses and identifies four basic parts of speech (adjective, noun, verb, adverb).

ELA4LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
  2. Actively solicits another person‘s comments or opinions.
  3. Responds appropriately to comments and questions.
  4. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

ELA4LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.
Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film productions, and electronic media) the student:

  1. Evaluates the role of media in focusing attention and in forming an opinion.

ELA4R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.
Critical Component: For informational texts, the student reads and comprehends in order to develop understanding and expertise and produces evidence of reading that:

  1. Identifies and uses knowledge of common textual features (e.g. paragraphs, topic sentences, concluding sentences, glossary).
  2. Identifies and uses knowledge of common graphic features (e.g. charts, maps, diagrams, illustrations).
  3. Distinguishes cause from effect in context.
  4. Makes perceptive and well-developed connections.

ELA4R3 The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing. The student:

  1. Reads a variety of texts and incorporates new words into oral and written language.
  2. Identifies and applies the meaning of the terms antonym, synonym, and homophone.

ELA4W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.
  3. Uses appropriate structures to ensure coherence (e.g. transition elements).

ELA4W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.
Critical Component: The student produces a narrative that:

  1. Engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a speaker‘s voice, and otherwise developing reader interest.
  2. Creates an organizing structure.
  3. Includes sensory details and concrete language to develop plot and character.
  4. Provides a sense of closure to writing.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States (as shown on the bottle wall) and the world (as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina).

 

Location- Right Hallway, Second Floor
(Outside of 4-D Movie)

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Connections

This glass case area contains many charts giving information about how Coca-Cola is involved in the green movement.

 

Location- Pop Culture, Second Floor

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Location- Taste It, Second Floortasteit4

Connections

This area allows students to taste a variety of products manufactured by The Coca-Cola Company from around the world. Students will notice a number of flowcharts in the room.


 

Grade 4

Lesson Plan
26 English/Language Arts Standards Met

Commercials! Commercials! Commercials!

Pre-visit Activity

ELA4C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

  1. b. Uses and identifies four basic parts of speech (adjective, noun, verb, adverb)

ELA4LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
  2. Actively solicits another person‘s comments or opinions.
  3. Responds appropriately to comments and questions.
  4. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

ELA4LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.
Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film, productions, and electronic media), the student:

  1. Evaluates the role of media in focusing attention and in forming an opinion.

EELA4W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.

Objectives:

  1. Students will view a number of Coca-Cola advertisements on-line to evaluate their effectiveness and use of language.
  2. Students will list methods used in the advertising to draw customers to the Coca-Cola product.
  3. Students will conduct a survey to discover which advertisement other students think was the most successful.
  4. Students will write and perform their own commercials.
  5. Students will write one paragraph evaluating what makes a commercial effective.

Materials

Time — 90 Minutes – 2 Hours

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Procedure

  1. Bring in a number of both magazine and newspaper advertisements. Ask students to list places where advertising is found. (newspapers, magazines, sides of buses, TV, movie theaters, fliers in the mail, video games, etc.)
  2. Discuss with the class some of their favorite commercials on TV. List them on the board.
  3. Explain to your students that the field trip to the World of Coca-Cola is coming soon. To help prepare for the trip, they will be doing some research into how and why companies use commercials, and they will evaluate the effectiveness of a few commercials made by The Coca-Cola Company. They will see references to some of these commercials at the World of Coca-Cola attraction.
  4. Discuss with your students why advertisements are used and why mail, TV, and even buses are used for advertising. Explain to students that millions of dollars are spent annually by companies to advertise their products. In 2005, $21 million was spent to place products in video games and $13 billion was spend on Internet advertising alone.
  5. Go to the Web site: http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/presscenter/av_advertising.html There are a number of commercials that can be seen on this Web site. Pre-view the site first in order to choose 3 or 4 that you want to use with your class. This can be done with one computer as a demonstration or with each student at his or her own computer.
  6. While students view the advertisements, ask them to jot down methods the company has used to get their attention and promote their product. Ask them to keep an eye out for any unusual methods that they think are particularly effective. Ask students to jot down effective uses of strong verbs or adjectives used in the commercial.
  7. Discuss what your students wrote as they watched the commercials. List effective verbs or adjectives used. Discuss how the use of language can either keep their interest or loose it. How does the use of language affect a customer‘s response to a commercial?
  8. Ask students to conduct a survey using at least five other students. They will ask what commercial was their favorite and why. Allow students about 10 minutes to do this.
  9. Discuss the results of the survey. How have the commercials helped to form an opinion in their minds? Have any of the commercials changed their opinion of the product or made them want to try a new product?
  10. Ask students to get into groups of three. Their job is to take 30 minutes to write and prepare to present their own Coca-Cola commercial to the class. Remind students that when presenting a commercial, how they use language (e.g. adjectives and verbs) is important.
  11. Present the commercials. Ask students to list particular nouns and adjectives that were used by other groups very effectively.
  12. When all commercials are completed, make a list of nouns and adjectives that were used particularly well.

Closing

Ask students to write one paragraph about what components make up a good commercial. Tell students to keep an eye open for effective language and how it‘s used within the World of Coca-Cola attraction. One of the galleries gives information about the early marketing of Coca-Cola. Ask students to take notes on how Coca-Cola has been marketed over its history. This information will be used in the post-visit activity.

Assessment

Teachers can assess both the work done on the group commercial and the writing done for the closing.

 


Have a Coke!

Post-Visit Activity

ELA4C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student:

  1. Uses and identifies four basic parts of speech (adjective, noun, verb, adverb)

EELA4W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.

ELA4W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.
Critical Component: The student produces a narrative that:

  1. Engages the reader by establishing a content, creating a speaker‘s voice, and otherwise developing reader interest.
  2. Creates an organizing structure.
  3. Provides a sense of closure to writing.

Objectives

  1. Students will use notes from their field trip to the World of Coca-Cola to write a narrative about how marketing has been used throughout the history of the product.
  2. Students will write the report in the form of a memoir of a Coke bottle. Students will take the viewpoint of a Coke bottle telling the story of Coca-Cola.
  3. Students will present their report to the class.

Materials

Time — 1 hour

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Ask students to take out their notes made while touring the World of Coca-Cola.
  2. Discuss with students the developments and progression of marketing over the history of the Coca-Cola product.
  3. Tell students that they will be writing a report about the marketing history of the Coca-Cola product, but they will be doing it from the point of view of a Coke bottle. Discuss different ideas for accomplishing this task.
  4. Give the attached rubric to your students. Discuss what is required and challenge them to work towards achieving an A.
  5. Give students time to write the first draft in class.

Closing

For homework, ask students to take the first draft home and do both revising and editing on the piece. Then, either type or write a final copy. Give students the due date for this project. You may choose to have students read their reports to the class.

Assessment

For homework, ask students to take the first draft home and do both revising and editing on the piece. Then, either type or write a final copy. Give students the due date for this project. You may choose to have students read their reports to the class.

Rubric: Memoir of a Coke Bottle

Circle the statement in each line that describes your work. Add the points at the bottom of the page and circle your grade.

Name__________________________________________________________________

 

The writing piece was very well organized and easy to follow throughout.5 points The writing piece was organized and easy to follow.4 points Organization was attempted, although not successful throughout.3 points Organization was attempted but not successful.2 points The writing piece had no organizational structure.1 point
The point of view of the Coke bottle was easy to understand and had many examples to back up the point of view.5 points The point of view was clear through most of the writing and had some examples to back it up.4 points The point of view was not always clear and had few examples to back it up.3 points The point of view was not clear and had two or fewer examples to back it up.2 points There was no point of view.1 point
The work was well thought out and held the reader‘s total attention.5 points The work was interesting and held the reader’s interest.4 points The work had interesting parts and attempted to hold the reader’s interest.3 points The work was incomplete and did not hold the reader’s interest.2 points The work was not finished.1 point
Provided a sense of closure in the writing piece that surprised or caused some sort of reaction in the reader.5 points Provided a very good sense of closure to the writing piece.4 points Provides closure to the piece.3 points Attempts to provide closure but was not totally successful.2 points No closure is provided.1 point
There were no spelling or punctuation errors. The work was neatly done.5 points There were no more than one spelling and one punctuation error. The work was neatly done.4 points There were no more than two spelling and two punctuation errors. The work was neatly done.3 points There were no more than three spelling and three punctuation errors. Neatness was attempted.2 points There were numerous spelling and punctuation errors. The work was messy.1 point

18-20 points= A     15-17 points= B     12-14 points= C     9-11 points= D     8 or below= F