Teacher Toolkit

Social Studies 5th Grade

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Grade 5

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
35 Social Studies Standards Met

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SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as monetary policy during the Great Depression).
  2. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).
  3. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

SS5E2 The student will describe the functions of the three major institutions in the U. S. economy in each era of United States history.

  1. Describe the private business function in producing goods and services.

SS5E3 The student will describe how consumers and businesses interact in the United States economy across time.

  1. Describe how competition, markets, and prices influence people’s behavior.
  2. Describe how entrepreneurs take risks to develop new goods and services to start a business.

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

social-studies-1-gallery1

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola. The process Pemberton followed as an entrepreneur is featured.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

SS5G2 The student will explain the reasons for the spatial patterns of economic activities.

  1. Define, map, and explain the dispersion of the primary economic activities within the United States since the turn of the century.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

social-studies-2-gallery4

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States (as shown on the bottle wall) and the world (as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina).

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

SS5E3 The student will describe how consumers and businesses interact in the United States economy across time.

  1. Describe how competition, markets, and prices influence people’s behavior.

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 6
(Lifestyles of Entertainment)

social-studies-5-gallery6

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how advertising reflects desired lifestyles at the time the advertisement was used. Slogans as well as the importance of automobiles are displayed.

SS5H8 The student will describe the importance of key people, events, and developments between 1950-1975.

  1. Discuss the significance of the technologies of television and space exploration.

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 7
(Within an Arm’s Reach of Desire)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how innovations have been used to change how customers purchase the Coca-Cola product.

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include ”Rosie the Riveter“ and the Tuskegee Airmen.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as monetary policy during the Great Depression).
  2. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 8
(International Gallery)

social-studies-1-gallery8

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery’s World War II case showcases Coca-Cola’s efforts to bring the product to soldiers in World War II, as well as the effects that the mobile bottling plants had on international bottling.

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 9
(Sports and Entertainment)

social-studies-5-gallery9-2

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases both sports and entertainment figures who were important in Coca-Cola advertising.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

 

Location- Bottleworks

social-studies-4-bottleworks

Connections

Bottleworks is a fully functioning bottling plant. It showcases how technology has been important to the bottling industry.

SS5H9 The student will trace important developments in America since 1975.

  1. Explain the impact the developments of the personal computer and Internet have had on American life.

 

Location- Pop Culture, 2nd Floor

social-studies-5-popculture

Connections

This area contains computers that allow students to make their own pop culture products.

SS5H8 The student will describe the importance of key people, events, and developments between 1950-1975.

  1. Discuss the significance of the technologies of television and space exploration.

 

Location- Perfect Pauses Theater, 2nd Floor

social-studies-5-perfectpauses

Connections

This theater showcases three ten minute movie presentations featuring Coca-Cola advertisements.

 


 

Grade 5

Lesson Plan
35 Social Studies Standards Met

Posters of Change

Pre-visit Activity

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include “Rosie the Riveter” and the Tuskegee Airmen.

Objectives:

  1. Students will become familiar with the changing rolls of women during WWII.
  2. Students will look at and discuss posters concerning women at work during WWII.
  3. Students will write answers about these posters.
  4. Students will make their own WWII poster.

Materials

Time — 60-90 Minutes

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Procedure

  1. Provide the following information to your students concerning women’s roles in the 1940’s. Before WWII, women who worked were young, supported themselves and were single. Once married, they took on the responsibilities of working in the home and raising children. However, as more and more men were drafted during the war, there was a shortage of workers to keep the war effort going. Thousands of married women entered the workforce for the first time. Many had never worked in jobs outside the home before.
  2. Group students into teams of three. Ask students to make a list of 3-4 emotions they think these women would have felt as they went to work for the first time. Discuss.
  3. Distribute the reading page, “Life on the Home Front” at:
    http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/TCR/1576901009_233.pdf to each student. Ask students to read this individually. Discuss.
  4. Distribute poster pictures to groups of students.
  5. For each poster ask: What type of job is the woman doing? Would she have done this job before the war? What does the poster say about acceptable roles for women during the war? What in the poster symbolizes this role as being acceptable? How might this poster have been used to encourage women to enter the workforce?
  6. Distribute the essay questions attached to: http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/women-aviators-world-war-ii-fly-girls#sect-introduction one per student. You may choose to have students do this activity in groups.
  7. Ask students to get into groups of three and construct their own World War II poster encouraging women to join the war effort.

Assessment

The essay questions filled out concerning the posters can be used for assessment, as well as the posters done in groups. The above lesson is adapted from a plan found at: http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=743#01 “Fly Girls: Women Aviators in World War II”

Closing

As a closing discussion, ask students how the posters tell us about American support for the war? Ask students how they think this movement of women into the workforce affected the economy? How did this movement of women into the workforce affect our lives today? Remind students that they will be viewing advertisements from World War II that involve women when they visit the World of Coca-Cola. Also remind students to read about Charles B. Hall in the World War II area as the post-activity will involve information about this aviator.

 


Who Was Charles B. Hall?

Post-Visit Activity

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include “Rosie the Riveter” and the Tuskegee Airmen.

Objectives

  1. Students will discover types of discrimination experienced by African-Americans during World War II.
  2. Students will learn about Charles B. Hall.
  3. Students will write about the experience of discrimination experienced by the Tuskegee Airmen.

Materials

Time — 60 minutes

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Ask students to remember the picture from the WWII case at the World of Coca-Cola. Why did Charles B. Hall receive a
    Coca-Cola? Tell students that at the end of today’s lesson you will ask why this award of a Coca-Cola was significant.
  2. Explain to students that discrimination was not unusual in the America of WWII. The military was not integrated, and African-American units were considered by many to be inferior at the time. The Tuskegee Airmen helped to change this perception.
  3. Distribute both the picture of Charles B. Hall and his biography to each student. Ask them to read it independently. Discuss.
  4. Distribute the article about the Tuskegee Airmen. Ask students to read this article either independently or with a partner.
  5. Ask students to break into groups to discuss what society must have been like to an African American during this time. Ask them to then determine the most significant thing an African-American would have to overcome. List on the board. Discuss.
  6. Ask students to take out a piece of paper and a pencil. Ask students to give a summary of what life was like for airmen like Charles B. Hall during World War II.
  7. Assign students to read a book about the Tuskegee Airman such as, The Tuskegee Airmen, (Cornerstones of Freedom) by Linda and Charles George, 2000, and complete a report in a poster, song, or oral performance format for extra credit.

Closing

Ask students the question first posed at the beginning of class – “Why was the award of a Coca-Cola to Charles B. Hall significant?” (If showed the ability of African-Americans to accomplish anything their white counterparts were able to accomplish.)

Assessment

Use the paragraph written by students about Charles B. Hall as an assessment.