Teacher Toolkit

Social Studies 5th Grade

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Grade 5

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
35 Social Studies Standards Met

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  • Standards are addressed through a self-guided tour of the World of Coca-Cola.
  • Standards may be fulfilled in more than one area of the attraction.
  • Please feel free to ask ambassadors to tell your class about their specific areas as you tour.
  • Teachers may choose to ask students to bring paper and pencil in an empty book bag for some activities listed below.
  • Look for the Coca-Cola red bottle to direct you to the appropriate student activities.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as monetary policy during the Great Depression).
  2. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).
  3. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

SS5E2 The student will describe the functions of the three major institutions in the U. S. economy in each era of United States history.

  1. Describe the private business function in producing goods and services.

SS5E3 The student will describe how consumers and businesses interact in the United States economy across time.

  1. Describe how competition, markets, and prices influence people’s behavior.
  2. Describe how entrepreneurs take risks to develop new goods and services to start a business.

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola)

social-studies-1-gallery1

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the time in which John Pemberton invented Coca-Cola. The process Pemberton followed as an entrepreneur is featured.

  • Watch the video clips in the first gallery. Review the concept of “entrepreneur” with your students. Ask your students why John Pemberton fit the definition of an entrepreneur (He developed a new formula for a drink, started the first factory to make the syrup, and got a patent for the formula.) Ask students what risks and problems stood in his way. (He risked money in the development of the product, he failed many times, he had to find a way to get people to buy the new product.)
  • Bring your students’ attention to the coupons located in the glass cases on the top of the soda fountain. Pemberton only kept the company for a few years; he then sold it to Mr. Asa Candler who was a marketing whiz. Candler developed the concept of free coupons to get people to try the new product. Ask your students how coupons for a free Coke would affect the behavior of future consumers of Coca-Cola. How do free coupons affect their own behavior?
  • Ask your students what the function of business is in producing goods. (to make a profit by giving public something they desire or need)

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 3
(Early Marketing)

social-studies-2-gallery3

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how Asa Candler used new types of marketing to grow The Coca-Cola Company.

  • Point out to students the numerous advertisements for Coca-Cola at 5 cents a glass or bottle. This price stayed the same for more than 70 years. Other goods and services went up in price over that time. Ask your students why they think Coca-Cola made the decision not to raise their price for more than 7 decades. (kept it very affordable, since more people would buy it the Company made more money)
  • Ask students to discuss this challenge faced by companies. Should the company charge more for a product and sell less, or charge less for the product and sell much more? Which decision has more potential to make the company the most profit? Which decision would have the most impact on the consumer?

SS5G2 The student will explain the reasons for the spatial patterns of economic activities.

  1. Define, map, and explain the dispersion of the primary economic activities within the United States since the turn of the century.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

social-studies-2-gallery4

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States (as shown on the bottle wall) and the world (as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina).

  • Explore with your class the expansion of the bottling operation starting in Chattanooga, TN and moving across the country from 1899 to the present. Show the expansion of the bottling plants with the lighted map and the touch screens.
  • Ask students how they think the expansion of the bottling plants impacted economic activity in the areas where they were started. (more jobs for people, they could then spend more money on other products in the area)
  • Ask students to write one sentence that summarizes the expansion of Coca-Cola from 1899 to the present.
  • Read with your students the information around the yellow truck from Argentina. Ask students how the bottling plant in Argentina would help economic activity both in Argentina and in the United States. (many jobs provided in Argentina such as in Coca-Cola bottling factories, glass factories to make the bottles, sugar production, delivery jobs, sales of the Coca-Cola syrup contribute to jobs and profit in the United States)

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

SS5E3 The student will describe how consumers and businesses interact in the United States economy across time.

  1. Describe how competition, markets, and prices influence people’s behavior.

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 6
(Lifestyles of Entertainment)

social-studies-5-gallery6

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how advertising reflects desired lifestyles at the time the advertisement was used. Slogans as well as the importance of automobiles are displayed.

  • Bring students’ attention to the advertisements in this gallery in which a car is also featured. Ask students to discuss why a company would use popular lifestyles in advertising. (The company wants to equate use of the product with a desired lifestyle.)
  • Ask students how advertising can reflect the preferred lifestyle of a particular time. (pictures and objects chosen to include in advertising are those that are desirable at the time.)
  • Ask students to use the advertising in this gallery to tell what was important to people at the time. Ask students to think of advertising today. What is in today’s advertising that tells what is important to us at this point in history?
  • Ask your students to write down slogans used by Coke through the years both in this gallery and in galleries as they progress on their tour. Slogans are used by companies to distinguish themselves from their competitors and to entice people to purchase their product. Some slogans your students can find in the attraction include: “The Pause that Refreshes”, “For the Real Times, It’s the Real Thing”, and “Quality You Can Trust“.

SS5H8 The student will describe the importance of key people, events, and developments between 1950-1975.

  1. Discuss the significance of the technologies of television and space exploration.

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

 

Location- Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 7
(Within an Arm’s Reach of Desire)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how innovations have been used to change how customers purchase the Coca-Cola product.

  • Watch video of early bottling and notice the glassrock cooler used at service stations. Discuss with students how gas stations have changed since the 1920’s. Share with students that at one time, when a car drove into a gas station people would hurry out to pump gas, clean the windshield, and often put air in the tires. Discuss with students why they think this has changed. (customer wants the lowest price and is willing to sacrifice service to get it.)
  • Look up in this gallery and find the actual dispenser used in space. Ask the ambassador in this room to bring out the space can that was used in space and see how it works. Students cannot use this can; it is for demonstration purposes only. Discuss how the space race was responsible for many new technologies such as the smoke detector, cordless power tools, body imaging, laser heart surgery, better helmet padding, and improved firefighter breathing system.

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include ”Rosie the Riveter“ and the Tuskegee Airmen.

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as monetary policy during the Great Depression).
  2. Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as trade activities today under NAFTA).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 8
(International Gallery)

social-studies-1-gallery8

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery’s World War II case showcases Coca-Cola’s efforts to bring the product to soldiers in World War II, as well as the effects that the mobile bottling plants had on international bottling.

  • Allow students to study the displays. Next, discuss with students the effects of rationing during WWII. The rationing (limiting use) of steel delayed the entry of Coca-Cola’s first metal cans into the market. Also, because Coca-Cola had sugar in it, people needed ration cards to buy it since sugar was rationed.
  • Point out Charles B. Hall’s picture in the display case. He was the first African-American to shoot down an enemy fighter during WWII. Ask students why they think he was given a Coca-Cola for accomplishing this task. (Coke had made an effort to give every soldier access to Coca-Cola for a nickel no matter how much it actually costs to make, it was a taste of home, the popularity of the drink) Put students into groups of two. Ask each group to write down one thing from today’s culture that might be awarded to someone who did something as significant as what Charles B. Hall did.
  • Point out to students that The Coca-Cola Company made a commitment to provide Coca-Cola to all U.S. soldiers serving overseas in WWII for 5 cents. To do this, mobile bottling plants had to be shipped overseas. Once the war was over, entrepreneurs in the foreign countries wanted to keep the plants and provide Coca-Cola in their own countries. The entrepreneurs were then able to provide jobs to local people, and give consumers a product they wanted.
  • Ask your students if they think Coca-Cola’s commitment to give the drink to U.S. soldiers for 5 cents would make soldiers more committed to the Coca-Cola product once they returned home.

SS5H4 The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I America.

  1. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age (Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile (Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 9
(Sports and Entertainment)

social-studies-5-gallery9-2

Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases both sports and entertainment figures who were important in Coca-Cola advertising.

  • Show the advertisements with Jesse Owens and Alice Coachmen. Discuss why including African-Americans in advertising signified a change in mainstream culture.
  • Ask students why the use of sports and entertainment personalities is a good way to gauge cultural development. (People and events that are considered important at the time are used in advertising. This allows people in the future to see what was considered important at a particular time.)

SS5E1 The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.

  1. Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States.

 

Location- Bottleworks

social-studies-4-bottleworks

Connections

Bottleworks is a fully functioning bottling plant. It showcases how technology has been important to the bottling industry.

  • Ask the ambassador in Bottleworks to give your students a short tour. This is a working bottling plant, however it operates at a much slower pace than a regular bottling plant. Ask your students to explain how the development of technology has helped to speed up production of Coca-Cola. Ask the ambassador to also discuss how tests on Coca-Cola are done now with technology, as opposed to the past when they were done by hand.
  • Ask your students to write a short paragraph on the benefits of technology to American business and how it impacts production.

SS5H9 The student will trace important developments in America since 1975.

  1. Explain the impact the developments of the personal computer and Internet have had on American life.

 

Location- Pop Culture, 2nd Floor

social-studies-5-popculture

Connections

This area contains computers that allow students to make their own pop culture products.

  • Bring your students’ attention to the two computers in the Pop Culture room. These computers allow students to create their own pop culture art work and then e-mail the artwork to themselves. Discuss with students how personal computers connect customers with companies. Ask how many students have families who shop on-line. Discuss with students the benefits/distractions for customers with customer service on-line. Be sure to point out computer access points within the World of Coca-Cola throughout your visit.
  • Ask students to discuss ways they use the Internet.

SS5H8 The student will describe the importance of key people, events, and developments between 1950-1975.

  1. Discuss the significance of the technologies of television and space exploration.

 

Location- Perfect Pauses Theater, 2nd Floor

social-studies-5-perfectpauses

Connections

This theater showcases three ten minute movie presentations featuring Coca-Cola advertisements.

  • This presentation is divided into three ten minute segments. Allow your students to watch the television commercials.
  • Ask students to fill out a Venn Diagram to show how commercials are alike, different, the same today. You may find the Venn Diagram at http://www.louisianavoices.org/images/edu_venn_diagram_blank.gif is helpful in this exercise.
  • Ask students how the popularity of the television has impacted product advertising and the consumer.
  • Ask student why a company like Coca-Cola would support and sponsor TV programming (increase sales, keep product in the public eye, gain public support)

 


 

Grade 5

Lesson Plan
35 Social Studies Standards Met

Posters of Change

Pre-visit Activity

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include “Rosie the Riveter” and the Tuskegee Airmen.

Objectives:

  1. Students will become familiar with the changing rolls of women during WWII.
  2. Students will look at and discuss posters concerning women at work during WWII.
  3. Students will write answers about these posters.
  4. Students will make their own WWII poster.

Materials

Time — 60-90 Minutes

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Procedure

  1. Provide the following information to your students concerning women’s roles in the 1940’s. Before WWII, women who worked were young, supported themselves and were single. Once married, they took on the responsibilities of working in the home and raising children. However, as more and more men were drafted during the war, there was a shortage of workers to keep the war effort going. Thousands of married women entered the workforce for the first time. Many had never worked in jobs outside the home before.
  2. Group students into teams of three. Ask students to make a list of 3-4 emotions they think these women would have felt as they went to work for the first time. Discuss.
  3. Distribute the reading page, “Life on the Home Front” at:
    http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/TCR/1576901009_233.pdf to each student. Ask students to read this individually. Discuss.
  4. Distribute poster pictures to groups of students.
  5. For each poster ask: What type of job is the woman doing? Would she have done this job before the war? What does the poster say about acceptable roles for women during the war? What in the poster symbolizes this role as being acceptable? How might this poster have been used to encourage women to enter the workforce?
  6. Distribute the essay questions attached to: http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/women-aviators-world-war-ii-fly-girls#sect-introduction one per student. You may choose to have students do this activity in groups.
  7. Ask students to get into groups of three and construct their own World War II poster encouraging women to join the war effort.

Assessment

The essay questions filled out concerning the posters can be used for assessment, as well as the posters done in groups. The above lesson is adapted from a plan found at: http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=743#01 “Fly Girls: Women Aviators in World War II”

Closing

As a closing discussion, ask students how the posters tell us about American support for the war? Ask students how they think this movement of women into the workforce affected the economy? How did this movement of women into the workforce affect our lives today? Remind students that they will be viewing advertisements from World War II that involve women when they visit the World of Coca-Cola. Also remind students to read about Charles B. Hall in the World War II area as the post-activity will involve information about this aviator.

 


Who Was Charles B. Hall?

Post-Visit Activity

SS5H6 The student will explain the reasons for America’s involvement in WWII.

  1. Describe the effects of rationing and the changing role of women and African-Americans; include “Rosie the Riveter” and the Tuskegee Airmen.

Objectives

  1. Students will discover types of discrimination experienced by African-Americans during World War II.
  2. Students will learn about Charles B. Hall.
  3. Students will write about the experience of discrimination experienced by the Tuskegee Airmen.

Materials

Time — 60 minutes

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Ask students to remember the picture from the WWII case at the World of Coca-Cola. Why did Charles B. Hall receive a
    Coca-Cola? Tell students that at the end of today’s lesson you will ask why this award of a Coca-Cola was significant.
  2. Explain to students that discrimination was not unusual in the America of WWII. The military was not integrated, and African-American units were considered by many to be inferior at the time. The Tuskegee Airmen helped to change this perception.
  3. Distribute both the picture of Charles B. Hall and his biography to each student. Ask them to read it independently. Discuss.
  4. Distribute the article about the Tuskegee Airmen. Ask students to read this article either independently or with a partner.
  5. Ask students to break into groups to discuss what society must have been like to an African American during this time. Ask them to then determine the most significant thing an African-American would have to overcome. List on the board. Discuss.
  6. Ask students to take out a piece of paper and a pencil. Ask students to give a summary of what life was like for airmen like Charles B. Hall during World War II.
  7. Assign students to read a book about the Tuskegee Airman such as, The Tuskegee Airmen, (Cornerstones of Freedom) by Linda and Charles George, 2000, and complete a report in a poster, song, or oral performance format for extra credit.

Closing

Ask students the question first posed at the beginning of class – “Why was the award of a Coca-Cola to Charles B. Hall significant?” (If showed the ability of African-Americans to accomplish anything their white counterparts were able to accomplish.)

Assessment

Use the paragraph written by students about Charles B. Hall as an assessment.