Teacher Toolkit

English Language Arts 5th Grade

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Grade 5

Georgia Performance Standards Self-Guided Tour for Teachers
13 English/Language Arts Standards Met

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ELA5LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-students, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Responds appropriately to comments and questions.

ELA5LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.
Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film productions, and electronic media) the student:

  1. Judges the extent to which media provide a source of entertainment as well as a source of information.

ELA5R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.
Critical Component: For informational texts, the student reads and comprehends in order to develop understanding and expertise and produces evidence of reading that:

  1. Locates facts that answer the reader‘s questions.
  2. Identifies and uses knowledge of common graphic features (e.g. charts, maps, diagrams, captions, and illustrations).

ELA5W2 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure.
Critical Component: The student produces informational writing (e.g. report, procedures, correspondence) that:

  1. Develops a controlling idea that conveys a perspective on a subject.
  2. Creates an organizing structure appropriate to a specific purpose, audience, and context.
  3. Includes appropriate facts and details.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 1, 2, and 3
(John Pemberton Invents Coca-Cola, Designing a Logo, Early Marketing)

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Connections

These three galleries outline the emergence of the Coca-Cola brand from its invention to its entry into the national market.

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 4
(Early Bottling)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases how bottling operations expanded throughout the United States (as shown on the bottle wall) and the world (as shown by the yellow truck from Argentina).

 

Location-Milestones of Refreshment, Gallery 5
(The Contour Bottle)

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Connections

This Milestones of Refreshment gallery showcases the development of the bottle shape used today for the Coca-Cola product.

 

Location- Gallery 7 Within an Arm’s Reach of Desire

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Connections

This gallery tells students how Robert W. Woodruff took Coca-Cola from a soda fountain product to a product found everywhere.

 

Location- Bottleworks

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Connections

Bottleworks is a working bottling plant. It showcases how technology has been important to the bottling industry. Fifth graders will be focusing on the flowchart located in this area.

 


 

Grade 5

Lesson Plan
13 English/Language Arts Standards Met

Everybody Has a Past!

Pre-visit Activity

ELA5LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-students, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Responds appropriately to comments and questions.

ELA5LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.
Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student:

  1. Judges the extent to which media provide a source of entertainment as well as a source of information.

ELA5R1 The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.
Critical Component: For informational texts, the student reads and comprehends in order to develop understanding and expertise and produces evidence of reading that:

  1. Locates facts that answer the reader‘s questions.
  2. Identifies and uses knowledge of common graphic features (e.g. charts, maps, diagrams, captions, and illustrations).

ELA5W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student produces informational writing (e.g. report, procedures, correspondence) that:

  1. Develops a controlling idea that conveys a perspective on a subject.
  2. Creates an organizing structure appropriate to a specific purpose, audience, and context.
  3. Includes appropriate facts and details.

Objectives:

  1. Students will get into groups to do research on the Internet concerning stories of past events in the history of Coca-Cola.
  2. Student Groups will present information they have discovered as a one-act play.
  3. Students will write about an historical event in their own past.
  4. You may choose to have the stories presented in class.

Materials

Time — 1-2 Hours

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Procedure

  1. Explain to students that their field trip to the World of Coca-Cola will be coming soon. The history of every person is filled with stories that make up their history. This is also true of companies. Companies have many interesting stories from their past that combine to make the history of the company.
  2. Tell students they will be using the Internet to read about some of the stories that make up the history of The Coca-Cola Company. They will then be getting into groups of three to present the information they have learned as a one-act play.
  3. Ask students to go to the computer and pull up this Web site:
    http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/heritage/cokelore.html. Stories are linked at the lower right hand corner of the site under the picture. Ask students to read a number of these stories.
  4. Once each group has read a number of stories and has chosen one that is of greatest interest, ask groups of students to perform a one-act play that shares facts about the story they have chosen.
  5. Ask each group to present their play. Once the groups have presented their play, as a discussion, ask students to judge how effective and entertaining they thought the Internet site was in providing stories of Coke‘s past.
  6. Ask students to think about an interesting event in their own past that would make a good short story. Brainstorm ideas to help students who are having difficulty thinking about a life experience.
  7. Remind students to think about their audience (other students) when they write, and to include enough facts and details to make the story easy to understand for people who have never heard the story before.
  8. Give students an opportunity to begin their story in class. Students should take the story home to complete for homework.

Closing

Remind students of the date of their field trip. Tell students that their job during the field trip is to watch the video presentations located throughout the attraction. They will note not only the short videos located throughout the attraction, but also the movies presented. Students should take notes as they watch media presentations noting how well the information presented helps them understand the history of the product as well as understand how it is marketed. The post-visit activity will use these notes.

Assessment

Assessments are based on the quality of the one-act play, as well as the writing piece.

 


How do Companies Advertise?

Post-Visit Activity

ELA5LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-students, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Responds appropriately to comments and questions.

ELA5LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.
Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student:

  1. Judges the extent to which media provide a source of entertainment as well as a source of information.

EELA4W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, an organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.

Objectives

  1. Students will use notes taken on their field trip to conduct a discussion about the effectiveness of media presentations.
  2. Students will complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the media presentations at the World of Coca-Cola attraction to a newspaper advertisement.

Materials

Time — 45 Min.

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Procedure

  1. Ask students to take out their notes written during the field trip.
  2. Discuss with students their thoughts about the more effective strategies used to market the Coca-Cola product as well as those they did not prefer or that they thought were ineffective.
  3. Ask students to list other ways or places used to advertise products. List these on the board. Discuss with students why companies use advertising. Ask students to think about what makes companies choose one form of media over another (Print verses video, etc.)
  4. Pass out newspapers containing advertising to each student. Ask students to choose one advertisement to use with the Venn diagram.
  5. Pass out a copy of the attached Venn diagram to each student.
  6. Ask students to use the Venn diagram to compare and contrast video media to print media. Give students about 15 minutes for this activity. Remind students that they will need to add a main title as well as labels for each circle section.
  7. Once the Venn diagrams are completed, ask students to get with a partner and compare their diagrams. Students may add/subtract items on their diagrams at this time.
  8. Ask students to write a paper (one page) comparing and contrasting the two types of media and share their opinions as to the effectiveness of each.

Closing

Ask students to discuss this question: “If The Coca-Cola Company could only use one form of media to advertise the product, which form do you think would be most effective?”

Assessment

The Venn diagram as well as the one page writing that compares and contrasts the two forms of media can be used for an assessment.

 

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