Teacher Toolkit

English Language Arts 8th Grade

Self Guided Tour for Teachers

Overview

  • Standards are addressed through a self-guided tour of the World of Coca-Cola.
  • Standards may be fulfilled in more than one area of the attraction.
  • Please feel free to ask ambassadors to tell your class about their specific areas as you tour.
  • Teachers may choose to ask students to bring paper and pencil in an empty book bag for some activities listed below.
  • Look for the Coca-Cola red bottle to direct you to the appropriate student activities.

ELA8LSV1 The student participates in student-to-student, student-to-teacher, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Asks relevant questions.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Actively solicits another person‘s comments or opinions.
  4. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

ELA8LSV2 The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas. The student will select and critically analyze messages using rubrics as assessment tools. Critical Component: When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g. television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student:

  1. Interprets and evaluates the various ways in which visual image makers (e.g graphic artists, illustrators, news photographers) communicate information and affect impressions and opinions.

ELA8RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student:

  1. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

ELA8W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.
  3. Uses traditional structures for conveying information (e.g. chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a question).
  4. Supports statements and claims with anecdotes, descriptions, facts and statistics, and specific examples.

ELA8W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres. Critical Component: The student produces a narrative (fictional, personal, experiential) that:

  1. Engages readers by establishing and developing a plot, setting, and point of view that are appropriate to the story (e.g. varied beginnings, standard plot line, cohesive devices, and a sharpened focus).
  2. Creates an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience and context.
  3. Relates a clear, coherent incident, event, or situation by using well-chosen details.
  4. Excludes extraneous and inappropriate information.
  5. Provides a sense of closure appropriate to the writing.

SS8RC1 Students will enhance reading in all curriculum areas by:

  1. Reading in all curriculum areas.

The attached activity document should be printed out for each student. They will answer questions as they proceed through the World of Coca-Cola attraction.

Note to teacher…students will need room to write their responses. I have provided approximate what space they will need for each answer. This document is 3 pages long.

Language Arts Activity Document World of Coca-Cola Name______________________

Directions Take this document with you as you tour the World of Coca-Cola. Answer the questions as you proceed through the attraction. Make sure you read all information and view videos to gain information you will need to answer the following questions.

  1. After viewing galleries 1-7 in Milestones of Refreshment, write a two to three paragraph letter in the person of Robert W. Woodruff to his employees explaining why it is important to make the Coca-Cola product available within an arms reach of desire for all customers. Be sure to include his point of view, which is well documented in facts you learned in gallery 7. Include any cause/effect reasons to support his decision. Conclude with a brief statement that summarizes Woodruff‘s points. Be sure to include a few facts from earlier galleries to support why this change in availability is needed in order for the company to expand.
  2. After viewing the movies in the attraction (4-D movie on second floor, Perfect Pauses Theater on second floor, etc.), evaluate how the makers of these movies have communicated the information about Coca-Cola and how this information affects your impressions and opinions.
  3. After touring Bottleworks (read information, view flowcharts, receive tour by Ambassador) get with a buddy to take turns doing a pantomime of how Coca-Cola is bottled. Your buddy will try to guess which step each pantomime is demonstrating.
  4. Explore Taste It on the second floor. After sampling the products found there from other countries use the space below to take a survey of the most liked product and the most disliked product in the room. Once you have asked at least ten people for their opinion, construct a graph on the back of this page to show the information you have found in your survey.
  5. Once you have conducted your survey, write a one-paragraph report on why you think the results came out as they did. Use your own experiences in the Taste It room to support your paragraph.

Pre-visit Activity

ELA8LSV1 The student participates in student-to-student, student to teacher, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Asks relevant questions.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Actively solicits another person‘s comments or opinions.
  4. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

ELA8RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student:

  1. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

SS8RC1 Students will enhance reading in all curriculum areas by:

  1. Reading in all curriculum areas.

Objectives:

  1. Students will conduct research on the Internet to learn about the World of Coca-Cola attraction.
  2. Students will work in groups.
  3. Students will prepare a visual representation to display information gained through research.
  4. Students will construct their own rubric from which their presentation will be graded.
  5. Students will present their information to the class.

Materials

  • Access to the Internet
  • Poster board
  • Markers (and other materials needed for presentation)

Time — 2-3 Hours

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Remind students that they will be going to the World of Coca-Cola attraction soon.
  2. Tell students that their assignment is to research the World of Coca-Cola attraction to find out about what they will be seeing and doing on their trip.
  3. Group students into groups of two or three students each.
  4. Allow students to research the World of Coca-Cola on the Internet and take notes about the history of the building, the galleries and elements of the attractions, or other items of interest. Students should note their sources.
  5. Ask students to prepare a visual representation of what they have learned to present to the class. This could be a poster, Power Point presentation, play, etc.
  6. Before beginning their projects, students will construct their own rubric that will outline how their project will be graded. With the class, go over what constitutes a good rubric.
  7. Present projects to the class.
  8. Each group should grade their own project according to their rubric, and explain why the rubric they constructed fairly represents their work.

Closing

Ask students which one area they are most interested in seeing at the World of Coca‑Cola attraction. What is it that they are most interested in learning? Remind students that during the field trip, each student will be given a form to fill out as they progress through the attraction. Remind students to read through the document before beginning the trip through the attraction.

Assessment

Teachers may choose to assess both their students‘ work in groups, as well as the presentation.

Post-Visit Activity

ELA8LSV1 The student participates in student-to-student, student to teacher, and group verbal interactions. The student:

  1. Asks relevant questions.
  2. Displays appropriate turn-taking behaviors.
  3. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

ELA8W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout and signals a satisfying closure. The student:

  1. Selects a focus, organizational structure, and a point of view based on purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements.
  2. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story.
  3. Uses traditional structures for conveying information (e.g. chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a question).
  4. Supports statements and claims with anecdotes, descriptions, facts and statistics, and specific examples.

SS8RC1 Students will enhance reading in all curriculum areas by:

  1. Reading in all curriculum areas.

Objectives

  1. Students will compare corporate leaders from two companies.
  2. Students will evaluate each leader‘s decisions and how these decisions impacted their companies.
  3. Students will conduct research on the Internet.
  4. Students will write a paper comparing the two corporate leaders.

Materials

  • Access to the Internet

Time — 2-3 Hours

social-studies-1-time

Procedure

  1. Ask students to take out the form filled out during their field trip to the World of Coca-Cola.
  2. Share letters that were written in the person of Robert W. Woodruff (question 2)
  3. Discuss with the class what makes a good corporate leader. How does Robert W. Woodruff fit in with the class description?
  4. Tell students that their assignment is to compare one other corporate leader of their choice to Robert W. Woodruff. This may involve more research on Robert W. Woodruff than was gained at the World of Coca-Cola attraction. This assignment will include important decisions made, leadership style, impact on their company, etc.
  5. Conduct research, note resources.
  6. Ask students to write a paper comparing and contrasting the corporate leader of their choice with Robert W. Woodruff. Remind students that they must support their opinion with facts.

Closing

Discuss with the class how management decisions affect corporations. List on the board what students learned that surprised them about The Coca-Cola Company due to the visit to the World of Coca-Cola.

Assessment

Teachers can assess the paper written by students.